Pinehurst (No. 2)

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Pinehurst No. 2, the centerpiece of Pinehurst Resort, remains one of the world’s most celebrated golf courses. It has served as the site of more single golf championships than any course in America and hosted back-to-back U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open Championships for the first time in 2014. The U.S. Open will return in 2024.

Opened in 1907, No. 2 was designed by Donald Ross, who called it “the fairest test of championship golf I have ever designed.” Ross was associated with the course for nearly a half-century, improving the course continually until his death in 1948. No. 2 is best known for its crowned, undulating greens, which are some of the most complex and widely hailed in the world. Ross believed in providing golfers with strategic choices, and Pinehurst No. 2 was intended to epitomize that philosophy.

Pinehurst was founded by Boston soda fountain magnate James Walker Tufts. He purchased 5,500 acres (22 km2) for approximately $1.25 per acre in 1895, and opened the Holly Inn New Year’s Eve of that year. The first golf course was laid out in 1897/98, and the first championship held at Pinehurst was the United North and South Amateur Championship of 1901. Pinehurst’s best known course, “Pinehurst No. 2,” was completed in 1907 to designs by Donald Ross, who became associated with Pinehurst for nearly half a century. After Pinehurst No. 2 was opened in 1907, Donald Ross said that the course was, “The fairest test of championship golf I have ever designed.”

The first PGA Tour major staged at Pinehurst was the PGA Championship in 1936, won by Denny Shute. In 1951, the resort hosted the Ryder Cup, and in 1991 and 1992 it was the venue for The Tour Championship. In 1999, Pinehurst staged its second major, the U.S. Open, won by Payne Stewart at the No. 2 course. The U.S. Open returned in 2005, won by New Zealand’s Michael Campbell. In 2011, Pinehurst No. 2 completed a $2.5 million, year-long renovation led by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw. The goal was to revert the course back to the original Donald Ross design.

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